newyorker:

A look at photographs from Iveta Vaivode’s series “Somewhere on a Disappearing Path”: http://nyr.kr/1nTivCS

(Source: newyorker.com)

ealperin:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

itsjustlarz:

PEOPLE NEED TO LEARN THAT LAST ONE FOREAL

HEY

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it’s okay I know everybody forgets Meet The Robinsons so I got your back

I think we’re forgetting someone:

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(Source: disney-where-dreams-come-true, via laugh-addict)

amnhnyc:

We’re celebrating National Moth Week with marvelous moth specimens. The existence of the Morgan’s sphinx moth was predicted by Charles Darwin more than 40 years before it was discovered! 
Take a peek at the moths we featured this week, the Madagascan sunset moth, the Hornet moth, the Atlas moth, and the Indian comet moth.
And find more moth facts on the blog!

amnhnyc:

We’re celebrating National Moth Week with marvelous moth specimens. The existence of the Morgan’s sphinx moth was predicted by Charles Darwin more than 40 years before it was discovered! 

Take a peek at the moths we featured this week, the Madagascan sunset moth, the Hornet moth, the Atlas moth, and the Indian comet moth.

And find more moth facts on the blog!

neurosciencestuff:

Controlling fear by modifying DNA
For many people, fear of flying or of spiders skittering across the lounge room floor is more than just a momentary increase in heart rate and a pair of sweaty palms.
It’s a hard-core phobia that can lead to crippling anxiety, but an international team of researchers, including neuroscientists from The University of Queensland’s Queensland Brain Institute (QBI), may have found a way to silence the gene that feeds this fear.
QBI senior research fellow Dr Timothy Bredy said the team had shed new light on the processes involved in loosening the grip of fear-related memories, particularly those implicated in conditions such as phobia and post-traumatic stress disorder.
Dr Bredy said they had discovered a novel mechanism of gene regulation associated with fear extinction, an inhibitory learning process thought to be critical for controlling fear when the response was no longer required.
“Rather than being static, the way genes function is incredibly dynamic and can be altered by our daily life experiences, with emotionally relevant events having a pronounced impact,” Dr Bredy said.
He said that by understanding the fundamental relationship between the way in which DNA functions without a change in the underlying sequence, future targets for therapeutic intervention in fear-related anxiety disorders could be developed.
“This may be achieved through the selective enhancement of memory for fear extinction by targeting genes that are subject to this novel mode of epigenetic regulation,” he said.
Mr Xiang Li, a PhD candidate and the study’s lead author, said fear extinction was a clear example of rapid behavioural adaptation, and that impairments in this process were critically involved in the development of fear-related anxiety disorders.
“What is most exciting is that we have revealed an epigenetic state that appears to be quite specific for fear extinction,” Mr Li said.
Dr Bredy said this was the first comprehensive analysis of how fear extinction was influenced by modifying DNA.
“It highlights the adaptive significance of experience-dependent changes in the chromatin landscape in the adult brain,” he said.
The collaborative research is being done by a team from QBI, the University of California, Irvine, and Harvard University.
The study was published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

neurosciencestuff:

Controlling fear by modifying DNA

For many people, fear of flying or of spiders skittering across the lounge room floor is more than just a momentary increase in heart rate and a pair of sweaty palms.

It’s a hard-core phobia that can lead to crippling anxiety, but an international team of researchers, including neuroscientists from The University of Queensland’s Queensland Brain Institute (QBI), may have found a way to silence the gene that feeds this fear.

QBI senior research fellow Dr Timothy Bredy said the team had shed new light on the processes involved in loosening the grip of fear-related memories, particularly those implicated in conditions such as phobia and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Dr Bredy said they had discovered a novel mechanism of gene regulation associated with fear extinction, an inhibitory learning process thought to be critical for controlling fear when the response was no longer required.

“Rather than being static, the way genes function is incredibly dynamic and can be altered by our daily life experiences, with emotionally relevant events having a pronounced impact,” Dr Bredy said.

He said that by understanding the fundamental relationship between the way in which DNA functions without a change in the underlying sequence, future targets for therapeutic intervention in fear-related anxiety disorders could be developed.

“This may be achieved through the selective enhancement of memory for fear extinction by targeting genes that are subject to this novel mode of epigenetic regulation,” he said.

Mr Xiang Li, a PhD candidate and the study’s lead author, said fear extinction was a clear example of rapid behavioural adaptation, and that impairments in this process were critically involved in the development of fear-related anxiety disorders.

“What is most exciting is that we have revealed an epigenetic state that appears to be quite specific for fear extinction,” Mr Li said.

Dr Bredy said this was the first comprehensive analysis of how fear extinction was influenced by modifying DNA.

“It highlights the adaptive significance of experience-dependent changes in the chromatin landscape in the adult brain,” he said.

The collaborative research is being done by a team from QBI, the University of California, Irvine, and Harvard University.

The study was published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

(via biologylair)

biologylair:

Okay seriously, with all the talk about Gluten-Free diets, what is it really? Get the scientific facts on whether gluten is actually bad for you.

 

blue-cinnamon:

dahowbbit:

goddessofsax:

Here’s a handy dandy color reference chart for you artists, writers, or any one else who needs it! Inspired by this post x

love

(via acrylicalchemy)

How to Tell Someone that She Is Dying

newyorker:

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Peter Ubel on the challenge that physicians face practicing medicine in an era of empowered patients: http://nyr.kr/1qrkYDA

“Most well-trained physicians believe that it would be a dereliction of their duties to act merely as information providers, standing aside while patients make bad…

(Source: newyorker.com)

newyorker:

Joan Acocella on Savion Glover’s “Om,” a “truly extraordinary dance show, one that you can tell your grandchildren you saw”: http://nyr.kr/U4ro0O
Photograph by Richard Termine.

newyorker:

Joan Acocella on Savion Glover’s “Om,” a “truly extraordinary dance show, one that you can tell your grandchildren you saw”: http://nyr.kr/U4ro0O

Photograph by Richard Termine.

(Source: newyorker.com)

Pascalle
our ends are beginnings

(Source: le0night, via you-people-are-toxic)